Recent Work:

Just Another Wall, Minding its own Business

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The first series of Just another wall, minding its own business is now available as a hardback book, softcover book or ebook.

Just another wall, minding its own business, 2020

This selection of photographs (series 1) were all taken at a property in Trevallyn, Launceston in northern Tasmania, Australia (GPS: -41.43803,147.12566) during the time of the coronavirus pandemic. The painted weatherboard (Tasmanian hardwood) house had been built on this site around the start of the 20th century, and I rented it as my home from 2013 to 2020.

During my tenancy I found the cracks, crevices, dents, rotting boards, mould, moss and general state of disrepair intriguing and I had already taken many photographs before the start of the coronavirus pandemic in 2020. As the year progressed, I considered myself fortunate in being able to continue taking photographs, especially at a time when many people were struggling with their own walls due to COVID-19 lockdown restrictions.

The business of walls is often to restrict and divide, but walls can also shelter, shield and protect, even if they are cracking and crumbling, falling apart before our eyes.

The photographs in this series include the interior/exterior walls of the house, garden retaining walls, old shed, the basement and bluestone foundations. There is no pattern to be found, no plan, no purpose — I simply responded to the quirks of the walls only if I happened to notice them as I went about my everyday activities.

Each photograph is merely the recorded remainder of a moment, a chance encounter captured with an old iPhone pulled out of a pocket. None of the images have been manipulated in any way — they are ‘as is’ — they represent a type of art that is available to us all in the everyday, art that is a part of life.